BeckysPhotoChallenge, Squares

July Squares – The Old Oak Trees

We’re heading off [virtually] to the countryside in the Alentejo region of Portugal.

Where the cork trees turn the flowing plains of Alentejo into an enchanting place of sun and shadows, it is here where the most extensive cork forests in the world are found. The sturdy old Oak tree with its gnarly tangled branches and thick truck are harvested of bark, usually during the late summer, which was when we were wandering around country roads admiring those sometimes lone oak trees.

The Squire captured during one of our many walks down countryside roads near Ourique while housesitting in Portugal.
The beautiful ocher coloured trucks after a recent harvesting of cork. To read more information regarding cork, head to a previous post – Housesitting and walks – Ourique

There ends the first post about a specific tree during July’s Square Challenge. To view more information about Becky’s July Challenge then head to Becky’s blog The Life of B or check out her latest post – A view with a tree with links to many more images from bloggers around the world.

38 thoughts on “July Squares – The Old Oak Trees”

  1. The ochre colour of the tree trunks is fabulous. I’ve never seen it in Portugal as I’ve never been in the right area at the right time but I have seen them in Spain where they also have cork trees and its breathtaking to view them en masse. All these looking-back blogs are making me feel bad about not being able to visit. I worry that my travels will be very much curtailed in the future, but then I’m sure we all do.

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    1. Not sure you need to feel bad about not travelling. You are well-travelled person as are us two. Perhaps, quite a few of us won’t get to do long haul travel again. Who knows? Though as I mentioned we got to enjoy the world without a pandemic. Regarding the future, I think there is no point in worrying
      about something we can’t alter.

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  2. I know next to nothing about cork, except that it grows on trees and there’s not enough of it. We tend to have synthetic cork in wine bottles (if they’re not screw-topped (we’re very cheap)), but the corkscrews tend to push them back inside the bottle

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  3. P. S I read your article about Ourique but couldn’t comment. We’ve bypassed the town a number of times. Next time we must stop off. The house looks delightful. πŸ˜ŠπŸ’•πŸ’•

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    1. Hi Jo, I’m guessing the reason for not being able to comment is because it was originally on my previous blog Globalhousesitterx2.com a few posts didn’t carry over in full. One day I may stay focused on sorting them out, then again, maybe not πŸ™‚

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  4. That is true, Janis, we take some things for granted, and I find those who first thought to exact the bark off the trees and put the cork to use the most fascinating. It is a thriving business in Portugal, well, it was when we were there.

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    1. Thanks, Jude. Those wonderful trees had us engrossed for quite a while. During siesta time we googled where to find cork products and more information on the trees. Portugal is an interesting country to explore. Though very hot during summer!

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        1. We have been to Portugal/Spain/Italy during off season and it does make a difference to getting out and exploring without the oppressive heat. Becky, you must be so looking forward to heading back to Portugal.

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    2. One of these days you will make it and we can meet up there πŸ™‚ we love exploring this part of Portugal but have only seen a tiny bit of the region. Lots to explore!

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        1. OlhΓ£o initially just so we can find our feet again – more than 2 years now since we were there. Plus friends to catch up with. We will though be heading up into Alentejo when we can as I love it up there so much

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